Feature Article in Farmers Weekly – EXCLUSIVE SURVEY: WHAT FARMERS SAY ABOUT RURAL CRIME

RELENTLESS RISE’ IN QUAD BIKE THEFTS

More than one-third of people (37%) who completed our survey said they had been a victim of quad bike theft over the past three years.

Responding to this finding in our survey, Clive Harris, NFU Mutual’s agricultural vehicle specialist, explains there has been a “relentless rise” in thieves stealing quad bikes from farms.

According to NFU Mutual, up to 13 quad bikes are stolen every week from UK farms. The rural insurer says the cost of quad and ATV theft rose from £1.8m in 2015 to £2.3m in 2017 and the numbers are continuing to rise.

Mr Harris said part of the problem was urging all manufacturers of non-road registered quads and ATVs to sign up to CESAR, the agricultural industry’s official forensic marking security scheme.

CESAR’s tamperproof, microdot identification system offers a first line of defence to deter thieves and reduce the desirability of stolen vehicles on the illicit market.

Mr Harris says: “We have been fighting a battle with some of the manufacturers to get them to sign up to the CESAR scheme.

“I commend Suzuki and Polaris for coming on board, but we need other manufacturers, such as Honda, which has the biggest market share of quads, to do the same.”

The theft of high-value tractors and GPS equipment – experienced by 6% and 5% of people in the past five years according to our survey – was also seeing a “disturbing increase”, Mr Harris adds.

Here are some tips to prevent quad bike and ATV thefts:

  • Have CESAR marking and registration system fitted by your dealer – at point of sale or retrospectively
  • Fit an accredited tracking or locating device
  • Store and lock your quad out of sight
  • Physically secure your quad – for example, ground anchor or similar
  • Consider making your quad unique in appearance – for example, different colours, logos or apply your postcode to main components

Source and full article at: https://www.fwi.co.uk/news/crime/exclusive-survey-what-farmers-say-about-rural-crime